Ohio House, District 25

Business owner challenges Boyce By Jim Siegel THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH A small-business owner is challenging Democratic Rep. Kevin Boyce in the redrawn 25th House District. The district, which includes parts of Downtown and northeastern Columbus, leans heavily Democratic. Boyce, 41, is a former state treasurer and Columbus city councilman who was appointed to the House seat in May after former Rep. W. Carlton Weddington was forced to resign. Prior to joining the House, Boyce was working as managing director at Rice Financial, specializing in municipal bonds. Republican Seth Golding, 49, is the owner of Greyhound Graphics and president of the University Area Commission. “I am a believer that jobs and the economy are, without a doubt, the biggest problem facing Ohio,” Golding said. “We need to be aggressive and do what it takes to solve the job issue. Also we need to take back The Ohio State University. I read in the paper a quote by an OSU provost that said ‘we need to search the world for the best and the brightest,’ referring to the students OSU should admit. OSU is a land grant college, for the students of the great state of Ohio, and I believe without a doubt the students from Ohio are the best and the brightest.” Boyce notes that during his time as state treasurer, Ohio “did not lose one dime of taxpayer money during the worst economy since the Great Depression.” “To promote economic development and encourage job creation in our state, the Ohio Treasury provided linked deposit programs. These programs focus on strategic investments that target the creation and retention of jobs, offer bonus interest rates on savings accounts, make homes more energy efficient, and provide farmers with operating capital at a reduced interest rate.”
Choose two candidates from below to compare.
  • Candidate picture

    Kevin Boyce (D) Investment Banker

  • Candidate picture

    Seth B. Golding (R) Graphic Arts

Change Candidates

Social Media

Biographical Information

The governor plans to propose a tax overhaul next year that includes lowering the state income tax and at least partially paying for it by eliminating some tax exemptions/credits/deductions. Do you agree with this approach, and is tax reform a top way to improve job creation in Ohio?

The governor has proposed increasing taxes on shale drilling (fracking) to lower the income tax. Do you agree with that idea?

What is your opinion of Senate Bill 5, the anti-collective-bargaining law passed last session and rejected by voters in November? Should the legislature try again to address at least some parts of the bill?

The new two-year state budget was balanced with no tax increases, but it cut schools and local governments by about $1.4 billion. Local governments will lose more when the estate tax is eliminated in 2013. Do you agree with how the budget was structured?

According to the latest estimates, if the state gets the $500 million payment this year from JobsOhio, as is expected, the Ohio budget is likely to end fiscal year 2013 with a surplus exceeding $800 million. Should this money go into the rainy-day fund, be used to help alleviate cuts to schools and local governments, or for another purpose?

The governor and lawmakers will try to tackle school funding again next year. What is wrong with the current funding system, and do you have ideas on how to do it better?

What is your opinion of the efforts by Ohio lawmakers in recent years to make it easier to carry a concealed gun and harder to get an abortion?

What else would you like to say to voters?

Age 42
Education University of Toledo, BS, Central Michigan University, MPA
Experience Treasurer - State of Ohio, Columbus City Councilman, President Pro-Tem, Finance Chairman
Family Wife: Crystal, two children
Religion Protestant
I believe we need to address the shortfall facing local governments across the state before focusing on a major tax overhaul. Any changes made to the tax rate need to take into account the recent cuts to the local government fund. Local governments across the state are facing a difficult road ahead. The economic benefits of a major tax overhaul will be lost if our local governments are not able to maintain critical services that Ohioans depend on every day.

We need to make sure that tax revenue generated by fracking is returned to the local communities that make this revenue possible. These communities face the potential for a great deal of additional costs that come along with hydraulic fracking. Several other states provide a large percentage of their severance tax revenue back to the local communities to offset costs caused by damaged roads, waste disposal and the other effects of a hydraulic fracking operation. These needs are heightened in Ohio due to the severe cuts that local government has seen in recent years.

I opposed SB 5 and actively worked to defeat issue 2 speaking out about its negative impact on state services, local economies, and living wages; public and private. I am in full support of the rights of public employees to collectively bargain labor management agreements. Collective bargaining provides employees with the negotiating tools to stand on equal footing with their employers and helps ensure the employee’s quality of life. To limit and/or deny collective bargaining is to limit the progress of Ohio.
I support utilizing a portion of the money in the state’s “Rainy Day Fund” (Budget Stabilization – BSF now at $246 m) as well as re-appropriating excess revenue (i.e., above estimates used to construct current biennial budget – current estimates are approximately $350 m over for fiscal year ending June 30th) to support vital state services. I also advocate evaluating current “tax expenditures” to determine which of them no longer serve their original economic purpose. If the underlying intent of these tax breaks is job creation then there should be better reporting and accountability of how many, the quality of jobs, and whether the added jobs were related to the tax incentive. We should incentivize the creation of private sector jobs that pay a living wage with benefits. Those that fail to meet the criteria should be repealed or modernized to improve accountability and to fit today’s economy.
It is important to maintain a strong rainy-day fund. However, we must also look at the needs of schools and local governments across Ohio. The current state budget made significant cuts to local government which will only become more pronounced when the estate tax is eliminated. Without some kind of change, many local governments will be forced to reduce or eliminate critical services.
I believe we need to create an equitable funding system for all Ohio public schools. Increased funding for public education across the state is long overdue. Where a child lives and has to attend school should not define the financial resources allocated per pupil. Our current funding system remains unconstitutional and must be changed now to provide the highest quality education for every child in the state of Ohio.
We need to inject common sense back into the debate on concealed weapons. As a supporter of the Second Amendment, we as Ohioans have the right to bear arms. However, allowing Ohioans to carry guns into public areas creates significant safety issues that endanger our children and families.

It is unfair and unsafe for legislators to force legislation regarding women’s health issues. A woman’s body is her private property and no one should declare what is determined about the availability of health care for women.
As a dedicated public servant, I work on behalf of those I serve. As the former Ohio Treasurer, my job was to protect all of Ohio’s dollars. During my Administration, the Ohio Treasury did not lose one dime of taxpayer money during the worst economy since the Great Depression. To promote economic development and encourage job creation in our state, the Ohio Treasury provided linked deposit programs. These programs focus on strategic investments that target the creation and retention of jobs, offer bonus interest rates on savings accounts, make homes more energy efficient, and provide farmers with operating capital at a reduced interest rate.
Age 51
Education Whetstone High School - Columbus Ohio
Experience Member of republican central committee University Area Commission - zoning - Code enforcement
Family Wife - Tracey Children - Julie,Sam,Sarah,Jeffrey and Genevieve
Religion Christian
Yes, It is vital that we stimulate the job market and further tax reductions and abatements for businesses willing to set up shop in Ohio.
Yes, I also believe that all environmental aspects need to be addressed and funds set aside to do so. Also funds should be set aside to deal with any unforeseen problems arising from fracking. I support the industry, but the environmental problems that could be caused need to be first and foremost.
Yes, two eighteen-year-olds start working at the same time, one works for the state and the other pays into social security. The state worker can retire at the age of 48 meanwhile the other worker has to work until they are 70. Is that fair? , I think not! As Paul Harvey always said "excesses are their own undoing"
Yes. The state was in crisis mode, the budget was balanced with hard decisions made and less state funding. It is time that local governments and schools also make the hard decisions that are being made by private businesses in the state that don't have the luxury of free taxpayer handouts to maintain business as always spending. At this time of economic disaster, the last thing the good citizens of Ohio need are higher taxes.
We should save a large portion for the rainy-day fund. Also to continue to provide a safety net to the 10% of our friends and neighbors that are unemployed and suffering. We need to make Ohio the place to do business and grow more jobs as fast as possible.
Candidate response is not yet available.
I am Pro-life and i support concealed gun rights. But i don't think they should be in bars.
I am a believer that Jobs and the economy are without a doubt the biggest problem facing Ohio. We need to be aggressive and do what it takes to solve the job issue. Also we need to take back The Ohio State University, I read in the paper a quote by a OSU provost that said "we need to search the world for the best and the brightest" referring to the students OSU should admit. OSU is a land grant college, for the the students of the great state of Ohio, and i believe without a doubt the the students from Ohio ARE the best and the brightest!

I also cant believe that OSU would propose to make any post first year students mandatory that they live in OSU dorms. This would raise the cost of college over 400.00 a month in extra rent and the mandatory meal plan. With the worst economy since the 1930's it is almost criminal that they would propose this plan. Also the state taxpayer would be paying 300 million for the construction of the dorms, sticking it to the students.
Voter's Guide