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Texas House, District 67

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    Jeff Leach (R) Attorney

  • Patrick Peavy (L)

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Biographical Information

Length of residency in your district:

Occupation/main source of income:

Education (include all degrees):

Highlights of current civic involvement/accomplishment:

Highlights of past civic involvement/accomplishment:

Previous public offices sought or held:

How much funding have you raised for your campaign?

Who are your top three contributors?

Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings? If so, please explain:

Have you ever been involved in any civil lawsuits or declared personal or professional bankruptcy? If so, please explain:

What is an example of how you led a team or group toward achieving an important goal?

What political leader do you most admire and why?

Why are you running for this office?

Why should voters choose you over your opponent?

What are the state's greatest challenges that government can address?

The current two-year budget restored billions of dollars from previous cuts. Are there places where you advocate more spending and, if so, how would you pay for it? Are there areas where you would spend less?

The state’s business climate is considered a jobs magnet. How would you improve on today’s business conditions, regulation or promotion?

Please assess the safety net for Texas' poor and working poor. What changes, if any, would you make?

The 2013 Legislature broke with the recent past and boosted spending on mental health care. What other reforms should lawmakers pursue to address mental health in Texas?

What would you advocate to prevent another disaster like what happened in West?

Texas' "Closing the Gaps in Higher Education" master plan is due for a 2015 update. Are there new directions or initiatives you advocate for the state's colleges and universities?

How will you judge whether the state’s new accountability system is working for public education?

The Legislature may have to contend with another court order to overhaul the system of financing public schools. What is your idea of a better way to support public education in Texas?

If voters approve an extra $1.2 billion a year in highway spending in November, that’s only a fraction of what TxDOT says is needed. How would you bridge that gap to meet the needs of the growing population: taxes, fees, tolls, borrowing, some combination, or none of the above? Please be specific.

An ABA-sponsored, bipartisan review of Texas’ death penalty recommended numerous reforms. What weaknesses or needed improvements would you cite in the administration of the death penalty?

Do you favor open carry for handgun owners in Texas?

Gov. Rick Perry has advocated "decriminalization" of marijuana possession. What changes would you support in prosecution of drug laws in Texas?

Would you vote to place a medical marijuana amendment before Texas voters?

What changes, if any, would you make in Texas’ open records and open meetings laws?

Should the Legislature pass laws that supersede local control over oil and gas drilling?

What, if anything, should the state do to reform laws that govern payday lending?

Address P.O. Box 866186
City/Town Plano, TX 75086
Age 35
Email Address jeff@jeffleach.com
Born and raised in Plano and graduate of Plano Senior High School. Shortly after completing law school my wife and I moved back to District 67 to raise our family.
Attorney for Gray Reed & McGraw, P.C.
Baylor University, BS 2004 Southern Methodist University, JD 2009
Member of the Texas House of Representatives, sworn into office January 8, 2013

Member of the House Committee on Criminal Jurisprudence

Member of the House Committee on Urban Affairs

Member of the House Committee on Rules & Resolutions

Member of the Texas House GOP Caucus

Elected by Members of the Texas House GOP Caucus to serve on the Texas House GOP Caucus Policy Committee

Member of the Board of Trustees for the Medical Center of Plano
Student Body President of Baylor University for two consecutive terms (2003-2005)

Served President George W. Bush in the White House Office of Political Affairs and the Republican National Committee (2004)

Prestonwood Baptist Church, Leadership in Young Families Ministry Program
none
I have raised over $133,000 for the current election cycle.
The Texas Ethics Commission asserts that any legal citizen may make a political contribution to a valid candidate seeking state office. These records are made publicly available through the Texas Ethics Commission website.
no
no
During the 83rd Legislative Session I took active leadership roles in advancing and passing conservative legislation for the people of House District 67 and the State of Texas.

Most notably, I authored a landmark provision to limit the reckless expansion of the Texas Medicaid Program under Obamacare. Additionally, I successfully authored legislation offering substantial tax relief to small business owners in Texas. Finally, I authored and supported legislation promoting the sanctity of innocent human life, keeping our communities safe and protecting our treasured right to keep and bear arms.

While I believe my conservative record of leadership speaks for itself, I have been recognized by numerous organizations across the state for my work last session.

• Named “Taxpayer Champion” by Texans for Fiscal Responsibility;

• Recognized as a “Courageous Conservative” by the Texas Conservative Coalition;

• Awarded the “Free Enterprise Champion” recognition by the Texas Association of Business;

• Received the “Conservative Leader Award” from the Texas Conservative Roundtable;

• Recognized as “Best of the Dallas-area’s Freshmen Class,” by the Dallas Morning News;

• Acknowledged as “Best Freshmen Legislator,” by Capitol Inside;

• 100% Rating from Concerned Women of America;

• “Perfect Pro Life Record” from Texas Right to Life;

• Endorsed for Re-Election by 80% of House District 67 Republican Precinct Chairs.
Abraham Lincoln. Our 16th President was a man of character and integrity who remained true to his principles when his cause seemed defeated. Furthermore, President Lincoln was able to unite his friends and adversaries to put their differences aside and advance the cause of freedom.
As a husband and father of two small children and a son on the way, I serve in the Texas House because I want my children and future grandchildren to have the opportunities that were given to me, all while ensuring that Texas remains the best place to work, play and raise a family for future generations to come. As I like to say, I serve at home to prepare my children for the world. I serve in the Texas House to prepare the world for them.
As a constitutional, free-market conservative, my top priorities in the Texas Legislature are to find solutions that limit the size and scope of government, ensure greater transparency, advocate for hardworking taxpayers and preserve conservative, pro-family values. In 2012 I ran on these fundamental principles and I can confidently attest that I delivered on these respective commitments during my time in office.
Thanks to the conservative policies put in place by our state leaders over the past decade, Texas has served as the national leader in job growth by offering a strong business climate, economic stability and exceptional educational opportunities. Because of this, Texas welcomes over 1,000 new residents each day. In order to sustain this economic success and continue the legacy of the Texas Miracle, it is incumbent upon the Legislature to strategically invest in our state’s long term needs by ensuring an adequate water supply, significantly improving our transportation system and preparing the future Texans of tomorrow. We must take proactive steps to ensure that public education dollars are flowing directly into the classroom where they do the most good, all while rekindling respect for parental choice.

Furthermore, it is incumbent upon the Legislature to address the current influx of illegal immigrants on our state’s southern border and definitively secure the border once and for all. This also is a top priority next session.
There are multiple areas where I would spend less in order to re-prioritize the core functions of government in our state budget. For instance, over the past 30 years, transportation spending as a percentage of the budget has decreased dramatically. This drop, coupled with our state’s exponential population growth, is a problem that must be addressed head-on during the budget debate. Transportation is a core function of state government and must be prioritized accordingly.
Providing the proper infrastructure to sustain our growing population is critical to Texas’s continued economic success. Additionally, lowering taxes, reducing burdensome regulations and encouraging businesses to move to Texas should remain as one of our state’s top priorities. As any successful coach will tell you – Getting to # 1 is one thing. Staying # 1 is quite another.
One of the greatest things government can do in this regard is continue to create a friendly business climate that promotes job creation and rewards personal responsibility. Furthermore, all children in Texas should have access to a top notch, high quality education. This starts with restoring respect for parental choice.
The 83rd Legislative Session went a long way to address mental health funding; however, further steps are needed to ensure Texans have better access to quality care. Like all problems in government, throwing more money at a program does not always resolve the core issue. A proposal most recently addressed by the Sunset Advisory Commission calls for the consolidation of mental health services, ultimately eliminating redundant layers of government bureaucracy within the Texas Department of State Health. As stewards of hard-earned taxpayer dollars, we should always be looking for ways to reduce and size and scope of government, resulting in better care for our most vulnerable citizens.
The devastating explosion in West has shed light on a terrible tragedy that needs thorough review and consideration at both the federal and state level. I look forward to carefully reviewing all proposals put forth next session.
In 1876 the authors of the Texas Constitution mandated that the Texas Legislature establish a “university of the first class,” which I take very seriously. We must take proactive steps to expand opportunities for qualified students, which starts with making college more affordable and prioritizing spending to ensure that more education dollars find their way into the classroom. Furthermore, Texas is home to some of the finest higher education institutions in the world. For instance, UT Dallas, which I proudly represent, is on its way to becoming a Tier One, world-renowned research institution. In order to cultivate institutions as such, Texas must create a more coherent, durable method to fund higher education capital projects for long-term planning purposes. Merely addressing the funding of capital projects from session-to-session is both short-sided and limiting.
We need to look at many factors, including student assessment, post-secondary readiness, graduation rates and student progress, among others. Accountability in public education is critical for our continued success.
I support proposals requiring that school finance formulas are subject to the sunset review process. Though not a perfect solution, this would shine a bright light on the complicated, nebulous formulas used to finance public education while promoting government transparency.
There is no question that infrastructure improvements are critical to our continued success and quality of life throughout our growing state. Having said that, rather than adding onerous tolls (as if taxpayers are not already burdened enough with current gas taxes, registration fees, motor vehicle taxes and toll roads), Texas must re-prioritize transportation funding as a whole in the state budget process. As noted previously, transportation spending as a percentage of the state budget has decreased exponentially over the past 30 years while population growth has skyrocketed. While I strongly support Proposition 1, which allots approximately $1.2 billion in additional transportation funding each year, this method is merely a Band-Aid to a larger, more significant problem. Plain and simple – the Legislature must take bold steps next session by having a real debate, early on, in addressing this funding gap.

Secondly, there are several ideas on the table in regard to the dedication of certain revenue accounts towards a fund’s intended use. For instance, currently all motor vehicles sales tax revenue flows into the general revenue fund to certify the state budget and is later distributed to an assortment of state programs unrelated to transportation projects. This money should be allocated to maintain and improve roads. Period. Dedicating this account alone would provide approximately $6.8 billion of supplemental road money each budget cycle.

Infrastructure is clearly a core competency of government and adequately addressing this funding shortfall will be one of my top priorities next session.
Even though I am a strong supporter of the death penalty, I will always be open to careful consideration of reforms that ensure we are protecting the safety of citizens and the constitutional rights of the accused.
Absolutely. Shockingly, Texas is only one of a handful of states in the nation that does not support some form of open carry. This needs to change.
As a conservative, I support common-sense policies that reduce recidivism and focus on effective treatment outcomes.
No
Texans want, need and deserve honest and open government at every level and I will continue to advocate for such.
Ensuring an adequate supply of energy is critical to the continued success and economic well-being of our great state. It is projected that by the end of 2014, Texas will become the 9th largest producer of oil and gas in the world. In order to continue this track record of job growth and success, our state leaders must promote policies that encourage safe drilling while protecting local communities. Like all legislation, I will carefully consider all proposals put forth as they relate to oil and gas drilling.
There are many ideas and stakeholders involved when it comes to reforming payday lending laws in Texas. Similarly to last session, I will carefully review all proposals as such.
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