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U.S. Senate

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  • David Alameel (D) Entrepreneur

  • John Cornyn (R)

  • Rebecca Paddock (L)

  • Emily "Spicybrown" Sanchez (G)

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Biographical Information

Length of residency in Texas:

Occupation/main source of income:

Education (include all degrees):

Highlights of current civic involvement/accomplishment:

Highlights of past civic involvement/accomplishment:

Previous public offices sought or held:

How much funding have you raised for your campaign?

Who are your top three contributors?

Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings? If so, please explain:

Have you ever been involved in any civil lawsuits or declared personal or professional bankruptcy? If so, please explain:

What is an example of how you led a team or group toward achieving an important goal?

What political leader do you most admire and why?

Why are you running for this office?

Why should voters choose you over your opponent?

The Senate's confirmation of presidential nominees for executive and judicial posts remains a persistent problem. What are your recommendations for improving the process?

What changes, if any, would you favor to the U.S. tax code? How would you build a coalition to enact those reforms?

Medicare’s finances still face serious problems, and the reckoning date is getting closer. What should Congress do to solidify the system’s funding?

Beyond Medicare, what changes would you recommend as a way to deal with the federal debt? Please be specific about the programs you would like to cut, reform or eliminate.

What approach should the U.S. take toward Afghanistan going forward?

What foreign policy challenge do you see as the next big international issue? And how would you recommend the U.S. deal with it?

What role should the federal government play in promoting alternative sources of energy?

Should Congress take a piecemeal or comprehensive approach to overhauling immigration laws? What is your solution to address the flood of unaccompanied Central American minors who came across the border this summer?

Should the Affordable Care Act be repealed? If so, what would you put in its place? If not, how would you improve it?

Congress has tried but never succeeded in reforming the No Child Left Behind Act. What would you like Washington to do with this bipartisan law?

Do you favor regulations to control carbon emissions? If so, what form of regulations? If not, what approach would you favor?

City/Town Dallas, TX 75230
Age 62
Campaign Phone Number (972) 479-5800
Fax Number 214-479-5801
My family and I moved to Texas in 1975.
Investor/Entrepreneur; former owner of Jefferson Dental Clinics
D.D.S. from UT Health Science Center
+ President, LULAC Greater Texas Council - Present + President, Alameel Foundation - Present + Chairman, American Lebanese League - Present + Advisory Board Member, Catholic Foundation (Dallas) - Present + Debes Creer en Ti (DCETi), Board President - Present
+ Centennial Award Recipient, 1999 (From President Bill Clinton) + City of Dallas Adjustment Board Member + Greater Dallas Area Asian American Chamber of Commerce, Board Member + Founding Member, Hispanic Endowed Scholarship Program “Open Doors,” Ursuline Academy, Dallas + Interdenominational Ministerial Alliance annual "Humanitarian Relation" Award Recipient, 2012 - Community Service
Sought election to the U.S. Congress from the then newly-created TX 33rd district, in 2012.
I am self funding this campaign, thus no major fundraising has taken place.
Refer to previous answer.
No.
I have never been named personally in any lawsuit, and have never declared professional bankruptcy.
From starting one dental clinic with my wife in the 70s, and through hard work, great patient care and service. strategic thinking and selective talent recruitment, we built a multi-million dollar business, comprised of 26 clinics and employing upwards of 350 employees, mostly women. Our dental clinic network was majority managed by women as well. Collectively, and since its inception, our family of dental clinics served the needs of more than 1.5 million patients.
Thomas Jefferson, for his erudition and political genius. In many respects, he was forward thinking for his time and was a prodigious writer, as well as an eloquent speaker. With all that, his famous break -and then reconciliation- with John Adams, also revealed the human side of his nature.
I am running for the Senate because I love this country and I want to preserve the 'American Dream.' I believe in economic opportunity regardless of race, gender, or economic status. I believe in low-cost, high-quality education for all of our children. I will defend Social Security and Medicare, because I believe people who have worked all their lives deserve the right to retire with dignity. I will fight to make big corporations pay their fair share of taxes. I want to rebuild our manufacturing sector, to create the kind of sustainable economy that pays good wages to working families. I want a national economy that puts money in the pockets of the Middle Class and favors main street businesses over big banks and Wall Street.
We have strong differences on the issues. I want to strengthen Social Security and Medicare. John Cornyn supports policies that would weaken them. I want to raise the minimum wage. John Cornyn opposes it. Mr. Cornyn has voted for unfair tax breaks for big corporations and special interests. I would vote to repeal them. He has put Wall Street interests ahead of the interests of the American people. I stand with Texans. He thinks prosperity depends on subsidizing and protecting the interests of the elites. I think it depends on opportunity and fairness for the Middle Class. I want to put America first. He supports a corporate globalization agenda that helps China more than America. I want to end offshore tax loopholes, and stop shipping our jobs overseas; he protects them. He wants to continue business as usual; I want to be elected to be an agent of change, teaming up with colleagues like Elizabeth Warren and Sherrod Brown to stand for the interests of average Americans.
Texas has more vacancies in the federal judiciary than any other state. Four of the vacancies have been deemed emergencies by the Judicial Conference of the United States and the Administrative Office of the United States Courts because of their backlogs. The biggest roadblocks to filling them are Sens. John Cornyn and Ted Cruz, whose Federal Judicial Evaluation Committee has yet to approve a single proposed nominee. In fact, Senate Republicans have refused to allow votes on dozens of highly qualified candidates for judge---a pattern of pure obstruction unprecedented in the history of the Senate. The Senate’s role is to advise and consent, not to obstruct and confuse. The government must be allowed to function. And, as Senator, I will work with presidents of either party so they can appoint qualified judges to the federal bench. In other words, the problem isn’t policy; it’s politics. Either Sen. Cornyn needs to change the way he does his job, or Texas needs to change who does his job.
My guiding principle on taxes is that corporations should have to pay their fair share. The federal tax code is a rigged system that favors corporations over middle class taxpayers, in effect favoring Wall Street over Main Street. I support re-examining the tax code to close the loopholes that generations of K Street lobbyists have carved for their clients. This should include the repeal of offshore tax shelters and loopholes to force corporations to bring home the trillions of dollars they are hiding in offshore accounts. Frankly, we can only build a coalition for reform when we elect leaders willing to stand up and fight for a fair break for taxpayers. I intend to do that in the Senate.
First: Medicare and Social Security are promises made to seniors who have worked hard, followed the rules, and made our country what it is. I will never vote to cut Social Security or Medicare, and I will fight Wall Street efforts to take over and privatize them.

Second: We have to rebuild a strong sustainable economy with real growth in GDP if we want to repair our national balance sheet. That would change the debate and end the false argument that we face some kind of reckoning. Cutting health care is not the road to prosperity. It’s a recipe for human disaster.

It is false to assume that Medicare is a basic cause of our national budget problems. The war in Iraq, an unfair tax structure that favors Wall Street and big corporations, and tax loopholes you can drive a truck through---those are the real causes. A national economic policy that directed more income to the middle class and less to Wall Street would produce the kind of economic growth that would finance a health system second to none.

Finally, there’s no doubt we can reduce the cost of medical care for all Americans—in and out of Medicare-- through administrative and economic reforms. Unnecessary and costly tests, huge overcharges by hospitals, over priced and over prescribed drugs, and too little emphasis on preventive care----these are all problems we have to solve in order to bring costs down. We should allow Medicare officials to negotiate with drug companies to lower the cost of prescription drugs. That alone would save billions in the long run. Health care costs are not unique to Medicare. In fact the Medicare system is cost effective and efficient compared to much of the private health insurance industry.
The same argument applies here. We have to rebuild a strong sustainable economy that benefits our whole society, instead of just a narrow segment. We must bring our manufacturing jobs back to our homeland; create vocational training for our labor force; and make Wall Street and big business pay their fair share. With real growth in GDP---spread broadly through our whole society---we can increase revenues, repair our balance sheet, and change the debate. Tax reform comes first. Closing corporate tax loopholes, regulating foreign tax shelters, requiring Wall St. and big corporations to pay their fair share, ending the subsidies to big banks and their over paid executives---all that will increase revenue tremendously. A more balanced, prudent foreign policy would also help us domestically. The war in Iraq was a mistake that has cost us trillions. It’s time to put America First. Europe and Japan should pay a bigger share of their defense costs. We should also pursue a pro-growth economic policy that encourages real production (paying real wages) instead of subsidizing the financial casino that Wall Street has become. Finally, there’s no doubt that cronyism and corruption have inflated the federal budget. In fact, it’s a scandal. There’s been an unholy alliance between some Washington politicians and special interests. We need agriculture and defense programs, for example, but there are too many bad deals and inflated costs caused by sweetheart relationships between private contractors and the politicians they support. We need to reform the way business is done in Washington.
I’m a veteran and strong supporter of the United States military. But after 12 years, it is time for us to leave Afghanistan, bring the troops home, and use the billions we are spending there to help rebuild America and improve our economy by investing in good jobs, good schools, and vital infrastructure. We can still maintain a relationship and give help to our allies in Afghanistan, but it is time to be prudent and admit there are limits to what we can do there. The current government in Afghanistan is corrupt and wasteful, and we need to follow a more realistic course. It is time to end the impossible burdens we have placed on America’s military families.
1. The rising power of the Muslim brotherhood in many African and Middle East countries; and the spread of the Sunni-Shia conflict. 2. The Iranian nuclear issue, the potential US-Iranian deal, and how it affects Israel and other U.S. allies. 3. Chinese military expansion and economic growth. That may be the most important of all.

Here is the absolutely vital point: We cannot be strong abroad without a strong society at home. Pay attention to the home front. Concentrate on growing the American economy, educating our children, and rebuilding our own infrastructure. We must never forget that we became the strongest nation in the world because we had the mightiest economy in the world. Economic strength is the fundamental basis of national security.

We have to recognize two things. We can’t ignore the rest of the world, but neither can we run the whole world by ourselves. Interacting with the rest of the world presents us with many options: foreign aid, trade, economic development, military alliances, diplomacy, and America’s reputation in a dangerous world. We must seek a balance between security and freedom, stability and opportunity, and that requires both a strong military and an engaged diplomatic effort.
America is now producing more energy than we import, and by 2020, we may be the largest energy producer in the world. However, our energy independence is based largely on hydrocarbon/petro energy--- which has grown more and more expensive to produce. Texas has profited from a dynamic oil and gas industry which has benefitted our state. At the same time, Texas has also been a leader in wind and solar power. The challenge is to promote a safe and environmentally friendly renewable energy base for the future, while making more efficient use of oil and gas. The petrochemical economy will continue to play a vital role for a long time.

The federal government must play a leading role in R&D to speed this transition. Other leading nations, China and Germany, for example, are ahead of us in this development. We spend hundreds of billions a year, year after year, on sources of energy that are harming our environment. Would it not be a smart investment to create alternate energy sources that ultimately will save us money and perhaps the planet itself?

The federal government should invest in research and development. It can set standards of energy efficiency that encourage new, less costly, more efficient methods and equipment. It can use anti pollution standards to promote clean air and clean water. It can support prudent use of tax credits and other incentives to encourage private enterprise to invest in alternative energy sources that produce wide spread public benefits and move us into the technological future.

Finally, in the Senate I will push for a “Buy American” policy in the purchase and development of solar and wind devices. Currently China often benefits more from the expansion of wind power in America than our own industry does. Federal dollars should promote growth in America.
I support the Dream Act and comprehensive immigration reform that is both humane and respectful of our laws. We should recall that one of our nation's best virtues in successfully addressing past complex issues has been that, as Americans, we've been more pragmatic than dogmatic. We can't let this problem continue become a tragedy for millions of people. - On the hundreds of thousands of children born or raised in America who live in a twilight zone of uncertainty for themselves and their families (the DREAMERS), we need to move forward in securing a path to legal residency that would then change to citizenship.

We also need to create a faster, accessible track toward a program of lawful work permits for a class of migrants that are employed in our agricultural, meat packing, hospitality, health and services industries, so that so-called low skills and low-income workers from our neighboring countries have a channel through which they can come to legally work to this country, but also return to their homelands when work slows down, or when better opportunities are presented to them there.

We must provide a responsible road map to legalization for those law-abiding and hardworking people who have no criminal record and are only asking for a fair opportunity, and whose only mistake was act as rational economic beings, by seeking higher return for their work in a higher wage country.

With regards to the humanitarian crisis at our Southern border, mostly created by the thousands of Central American (OTMs) children seeking refuge or attempting to reunite with their parents, I believe that those cases that meet our standards for refugee protection or asylum should be given it, as well as those who have immediate family members with whom they are trying to reunite.

I support greater federal resources for all our men and women tasked with the duty of protecting our borders, and will work to ensure our Southern border is secured. But this will be achieved, not with theatrical displays of military force and staged performances of bravado from our elected officials, but by smart, Risk-based Analysis and targeted deployments of law enforcement that: a) Attack and repel Drug Cartel smugglers b) Identify and arrest members of global terror networks, and c) Help to break up human smuggling rings

For all of the above, we need the cooperation of Mexico and our Central American neighbors. Therefore, I will work to ensure that our next door neighbors also step up to the plate and do their fair share to stem the tide of migrants from their lands to ours.

I favor a comprehensive approach to immigration reform, otherwise we will continue for decades attempting to build the political consensus to address each component of this issue individually. Let's sit down and fix this problem now.
First, let me say this. It is immoral and unconscionable for Governor Rick Perry to deny working families one of the greatest benefits of the new law---the expansion of Medicaid that would bring decent health care to hundreds of thousands of Texas families, including many veterans. We need to end this kind of blind cruelty that sacrifices public health for politics.

Medicare was once called “socialism.” No one says that now. Most new programs, even the best, have glitches and problems. We should fix the problems with the new Affordable Care Act, while retaining its best features----such as coverage for pre-existing conditions, no lifetime limits on care, and help for families to make insurance more affordable.

Repealing the Affordable Care Act is not an achievable goal. Even assuming that a Republican President, a Republican Congress, and a Republican Senate could get the votes to repeal the ACA in 2017, by then millions of Americans would be enjoying myriad benefits from the law, such as coverage for pre-existing conditions, no lifetime limits for care, Medicaid expansion, free preventive care for seniors under Medicare( with no copay), and financial assistance to families to help pay for insurance.

I will, however, work for improvements as Senator:

1) Signing up for policies on the federal insurance exchange must be easy, clear, and reliable. The private contractors who designed it did not do a first rate job. Right now, consumers are confused about the differences between what they can get on the exchange versus the option of simply re-upping policies with their insurance carriers. Making this a clearly understood choice is essential for it to work..

2) We need more insurance companies offering qualifying heath care policies in the exchange. More competition will make prices more competitive.

3) We will need to address the situation of families whose income is not low enough to be eligible for subsidies, but who do not have adequate insurance coverage at their place of work. For some people caught in the middle, health coverage still costs more than it should.
Education is a national security issue in this age of a global economy. We must ensure quality education that is not based on how rich or how poor a neighborhood is. Countries faring well today are often those (like Finland or South Korea, for example) with national education systems that allow the best and brightest to achieve their full potential. I approve the bipartisan action of the Texas Legislature in recently reducing the number of mandatory tests for Texas students. Standardized tests, with impossible quotas and unrealistic goals, are not the ultimate solution to our education needs. Tests are helpful measurements, but they are not the final answer. I believe every child deserves the opportunity to receive a quality education. The public education system has been one of the glories of the American success story. I want to strengthen that system, not tear it apart. High expectations should be the norm, but we cannot expect great achievement unless we understand that poverty and family circumstances are the most important factors in a child’s performance in school. Improve economic opportunity and you will also improve educational opportunity.

As Senator I would promote federal help for the following goals: 1) Expand access to Pre-K programs. Too many students from lower-socioeconomic status families show up for kindergarten and the first grade inadequately prepared, and they never catch up. This is why Pre-K is so vital. Education can lift people out of poverty, but they have to be able to reach the ladder. 2) Create enriching, engaging programs for children during the summer, which would mean less review more advanced preparation for when they go back to school in the Fall. 3) Innovative assessments. No one will ever cure cancer by filling out a standardized check-the-bubble test. We must free states to experiment with methods of student assessment that provide accurate, realistic accountability instead of just “studying to the test.” We need to teach children critical thinking, not just rote answers to tests. 4) Finally, and most importantly, bringing economic opportunity to all working families is the best method of ensuring educational success. A healthy economy produces stronger families, and that produces children who are ready to learn. It all starts with fairness and opportunity.
As I noted previously, we are spending billions every year on energy sources that are growing more expensive and are harming our environment. We can’t achieve perfection instantly, and we have to work within the system we have. But, in the long run, we have no choice but to transition to cleaner alternative energy sources. Global warming is not a fantasy. Regardless of what position we may take on that issue, it is in our interest to achieve healthier, more economical, less harmful energy use. As I noted previously, we are spending billions every year on energy sources that are growing more expensive and are harming our environment. We can’t achieve perfection instantly, and we have to work within the system we have. But, in the long run, we have no choice but to transition to cleaner alternative energy sources. Global warming is not a fantasy. Regardless of what position we may take on that issue, it is in our interest to achieve healthier, more economical, less harmful energy use.

Reducing emissions is important and possible.

I would only be in favor of a “cap and trade” agreement that treats all emitting countries equally and fairly. Sadly, the present scheme unduly punishes the U.S. and other emitting countries while giving a pass to so-called ‘less developed’ emitters, like China. Fair cap and trade policies -applied globally- is the answer.

I do not believe we can afford to continue postponing this issue. Doing nothing is not a solution. That is why I propose that if other countries like China refuse to join, then we can unilaterally apply environmental regulations, on condition that we pass the extra cost to other countries who refuse to join us in the form of tariffs, to balance out the unfairness of increased cost to our economy.
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