Arizona House, District 9

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  • Randall Friese
    (Dem)

  • Ana Henderson
    (Rep)

  • Candidate picture

    Pamela Powers Hannley
    (Dem)

Social Media

Biographical Information

What makes you the best person for the job? (for YouTube VIDEO only)

Do you support or oppose an independent examination of whether private prisons save taxpayers money?

What can the state do to reduce the number of children in foster care?

Do you support the Legislature’s decision to expand KidsCare, the state’s child health program? Why or why not?

The Groundwater Management Act applies to the state’s metropolitan counties, and ensures a 100-year water supply as a condition of development. Does rural Arizona need similar protections, why or why not?

Should Arizona help build a wall along the U.S. border with Mexico? If so, how should it fund such it?

Which state agency or agencies do you believe are underfunded and why? Which state agency or agencies do you believe are bloated and why?

Do lobbyists have too much influence over the lawmaking process? If so, what should be done to rein them in?

Should the Legislature continue to hold key budget debates in the middle of the night, as has been the custom in recent years?

What is your opinion on the tuition charged by Arizona’s public universities? What, if anything, should the Legislature do about it?

Does the state need additional regulations on abortions? If yes, how would you regulate them?

Many Arizona municipalities say the state has usurped local rule by prohibiting or limiting ordinances on vacation rentals, plastic grocery bags, minimum wage and paid sick leave. Do you support limits on municipalities' ability to govern themselves? Why or why not?

Should Arizona legalize marijuana? Why or why not?

Should the Legislature do anything to try to prevent mass shootings? If so, what?

Gov. Doug Ducey said Prop. 123 was the first step for school funding. Do you see a need for additional steps? What should they be?

Should the Legislature make additional funding for schools a priority?

What reforms would you suggest to improve Arizona's education system?

Do you support expanding the empowerment scholarship account program to all Arizona students?

Gov. Doug Ducey has promised to cut taxes every year. Would you support additional tax cuts? If so, which taxes and why?

Do you support Gov. Doug Ducey’s goal of reducing the state income-tax to as close to zero as possible? If so, how would you achieve that goal? Would you support an increase to other taxes to offset income tax cuts?

What is the greatest threat to Arizona’s future, and how would you address it?

Do you support your party's nominee for president, why or why not?

What is the best piece of political advice you ever received?

What is your favorite book (besides a spiritual text)?

What favorite movie has meaning for you?

What is your favorite place in Arizona?

Which Arizona political figure past or present do you most admire and why?

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Campaign Phone (520) 225-7139
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Age 67
Family Married to Jim Hannley. Grown children: Alexandra Queen and Edward Queen Two step children: Sean Hannley and Stephen Hannley Two grandchildren: William Calamia and Isabella Queen. Everyone lives in Tucson.
Education BA in Journalism from Ohio State University. Masters in Public Health from University of Arizona
Work history 2016-present: Social Media/Technology Editor, The American Journal of Medicine (Alma Publishing),Tucson, Arizona, 1/2016 to present 2005-2006: Adjunct instructor of health education, Introduction to Health Services class, Pima Community College, Tucson, Arizona, fall 2005 and spring 2006 semesters. 2004-2015: Managing Editor, The American Journal of Medicine (Alma Publishing), Tucson, Arizona, 11/2004 to 12/2015 2004: Associate Specialist, Research, Health Promotion Sciences Division, Mel and Enid Zuckerman Arizona College of Public Health, University of Arizona, 7/2004-11/2004. 2004: Adjunct instructor of health education, Personal Health and Wellness class, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, spring 2004. 1998-2004: Program Director, Appointed Personnel, Network for Information and Counseling, Mel and Enid Zuckerman Arizona College of Public Health, University of Arizona, 2/1998-6/2004. Principal investigator for the Arizona Smokers’ Helpline, several health-related Websites, and Data Management and Evaluation Team. 1999-2000: Principal investigator and project manager for the “Tobacco Free Ways Website Development Project”, 1999-2000. 1998-99: Principal Investigator and Project Manager for the “Pima County Cessation Services Directory” project, 1998-99. 1996-1998: Research Specialist Senior/Multimedia Coordinator and Grant Writer, Behavioral Sciences Section, Arizona Cancer Center, The University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, Arizona. 1990-1996: Publications Manager/Editor, Arizona Cancer Center, The University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, Arizona. 1986-1993: Communication/Marketing Consultant, Powers/Queen Associates, Tucson, Arizona. Representative Clients: Arizona Cancer Center, University Medical Center, Great American Bank in Arizona and California, The Tucson Mall, Jones Intercable, Advertising & Marketing Magazine, Tucson Lifestyle Magazine. 1986-1993: Freelance writer and photographer for Advertising & Marketing Magazine, Tucson Lifestyle Magazine, and Dateline Downtown, Tucson, Arizona 1987: Public Relations and Marketing Consultant for Pie Allen Neighborhood Association 1985-1986: Public Relations Coordinator, Grand Canyon State Electric Cooperative, Phoenix, Arizona 1982-1986: Information Specialist, Arizona Electric Power Cooperative, Inc., Benson, Arizona and more on my website at https://powersforthepeople.net/home/about/curriculum-vitae/
Twitter @p2hannley
Previous public office None
Campaign Phone (520) 609-0178
How long have you lived in Arizona: 35 years
how long have you been registered as a member of your party: since 1972
Previous public offices you’ve sought/held: None
Civic organizations in which you’ve been active: Arizonans for a New Economy, Progressive Democrats of America, Arizona Democratic Party, Public Relations Society of America (current). International Association of Business Communicators, American Public Health Association, Wellness Council of Tucson, and the American Cancer Society (past). I am also a political blogger at Blog for Arizona; I consider blogging a public service.
With my background in communications, management and small business ownership, I believe that I would bring a unique skill set to the Arizona Legislature. I worked for many years in medical and health communication before earning a Masters in Public Health (MPH) and moving into medical and public health management and research. I also have owned two successful small businesses. I believe the Legislature could use someone with a public health and family focus. Often decisions are made for short-term financial gain, but these decisions have dire long-term public health consequences (such as funding debates over KidsCare and Medicaid expansion and the problems with the Department of Child Safety, to name a few). As a Mom, a Grandma, a progressive, and a Clean Elections candidate, I want to serve the workers and families of Arizona. I believe the people need a voice in the Legislature. I want to be that voice.
I stand against mass incarceration. My goal would be to reduce the number of private prisons and reduce the number of citizens imprisoned for non-violent crimes, like low-level drug offenses.

Yes, I would wholeheartedly support a review of the private prison industry. The voters deserve transparency.
First of all, make sure that the Department of Child Safety has appropriate funding and trained staff to promptly, efficiently, and compassionately process child welfare cases.

Arizona’s shamefully high number of children in foster care or under court supervision is a symptom of a society that is failing its families. Workers don't make enough money. Low wages, high poverty, crumbling public education system, food insecurity, housing insecurity, and few opportunities—all of these put stress on families. Economic stress can lead to drug addiction, domestic violence, crime and more.

Our focus shouldn’t be “fixing the Department of Child Safety”. Our focus should be raising people out of poverty by helping Arizona families thrive.
Yes, I support expanding KidsCare. From a public health standpoint and from a long-term economic standpoint, keeping our citizens healthy—all of them—is just good common sense.
I believe that if you ask rural Arizona residents if they want their children and grandchildren to have fresh clean water coming from their tap, they would say, “yes.” So—yes, I think rural Arizona should have similar water protections as the metro areas. Water is the life-blood of human existence. We should protect our supply.
No, building a wall is a campaign slogan—not a sensible, financially plausible, or environmentally sound solution to human migration across the border.

If the goal is to reduce the number of undocumented workers and asylum seekers from Mexico and Central America who enter Arizona without proper documents, we should look at the root causes for migration north. Instead of blaming the victims of economic hardship or violence, let’s look at why they leave their homes and risk the journey. US policies have fueled migration—particularly the North Atlantic Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the failed War on Drugs. Legalization of marijuana would do more to “stop criminals from entering our country illegally” than building a wall.
K-12 education is grossly underfunded. Arizona’s government should pay the schools what we owe them and fund all-day kindergarten, after-school programs, and daycare subsidies. Recently, 1400 third graders were held back because they can’t read at grade level and failed a high-stakes reading test. Those little children didn’t fail that test; Arizona’s education system failed them.

Funding to the university system should be restored. University-based research and innovation create spin-off businesses, good-paying jobs, opportunities for learning, and additional research funding. We should invest in our future by investing in education at all levels.

Community collegefunding should be restored. Community colleges a valuable bridge between high school and a university. Others find the work-related certificates worthwhile.

Fully fund and appropriately staff the Department of Child Safety.

Regarding bloat, I would look at authorities and commissions to see if they are all necessary.
Yes, definitely, lobbyists have too much power. Arizona needs serious campaign finance reform. Thanks to PAC money, dark money, and carry-over war chests from past campaigns, many incumbents have successfully built walls of money around themselves. Some have surprisingly little financial support from real people. I think the Clean Elections system should be strengthened, streamlined, and encouraged. I am a Clean Elections candidate, and I am proud to say that my supporters are voters—not big money donors or lobbyists.
Absolutely not. This is so obviously a tactic to hide what they are doing. Good government requires sunshine.
I think we should go back to the original intent of the land grant university and make tuition as free as possible.

I think community colleges should be free. President Obama has said that free community college would be more cost effective that backing loans, as we do now.

Arizona has plenty of money. We’re just throwing billions away in corporate tax cuts, corporate tax credits, unnecessary lawsuits, and interest on our debt.
No. Abortion is legal. The decision should be made between a woman and her healthcare provider. The government should keep out.

If the goal is to reduce the number of surgical abortions, the government should make the morning after pill more readily available, make contraception cheaper (or free), and require medically accurate sex education in the schools. These steps would reduce unwanted pregnancies.
No. The state should not pre-empt local ordinances. If cities want to help their citizens by raising the minimum wage or requiring paid sick leave, they should be able to pass local ordinances to make it so.
Yes. There are humanitarian and economic reasons to legalize marijuana. Arizona has an opiate problem, not a marijuana problem. A 2014 Harvard study showed that states that had medical marijuana for five years or more saw a 25% decrease in death from opiate overdose. That is a significant decrease in death. If pain patients can switch to a plant that never killed anyone, we could see a decrease in our opiate overdose problem. We should focus our anti-drug efforts on prescription drug abuse, heroin, meth, spice and other drugs that kill and addict our citizens and allow the voters to decide the marijuana question.

Economically, marijuana arrests and incarcerations are often discriminatory, and they contribute to Arizona’s oversized prison population.

Lastly, our state could use the sales tax revenue.
Yes. Too many innocent people are dying. More guns don’t make us safer.

We should require universal background checks and close gun show loopholes. We should offer safe storage incentives to parents, for example lower insurance rates to keep your weapons locked and unloaded. There should be no guns on educational campuses. Laws denying weapons to domestic violence perpetrators or those on probation for domestic violence should be strictly enforced.
Arizona has plenty of money to fully fund public education as per the recommendation made by the judge. The state also should comply with the original citizens’ initiative which linked school funding with inflation.

Arizona is wasting $4 billion per year in corporate tax cuts and hundreds of millions more in corporate tax credits, unnecessary lawsuits, and debt to Wall Street. We should stop wasting these taxpayer funds and starting building a stronger Arizona for future generations.
Yes. The Legislature should fully fund the public education system as per the recommendations made by the judge and should comply with the original citizens’ initiative which linked school funding with inflation. Prop 123 is a bad deal in the long run for our educational system and our children.
High-stakes testing isn’t working. Recently, 1400 third graders learned that they will be held back because they can’t read at grade level and didn’t pass Arizona’s latest high-stakes test. Those children didn’t fail the test. The system failed them. We should prepare our children for school by providing all-day kindergarten, childcare subsidies, reading tutors, and English literacy for parents and relatives. Let’s help the families succeed.

Student test scores on high-stakes tests shouldn’t be used to grade teachers or schools. All students and families are not equal. A student who comes to school hungry and tired will not perform as well on a test as a student who slept securely in his own bed and ate breakfast. Poor children deserve an education that is just as good as everyone else.

There should be level playing field between charter schools and public schools regarding salaries, teacher certification policies, administrative overhead, per pupil funding, curricula, etc.
No. I think we should fully fund public education. We should bring back recess, physical education, music, art, home economics, home mechanics, and study halls. All of these school offerings contribute to a well-rounded education.
No. The Arizona government has been starved to the point where jobs have been lost, some departments barely function, infrastructure is crumbling, and needed services and benefits are no longer provided to our citizens.

I want a government that functions properly and that serves the taxpayers. Arizona currently has neither. Budget cuts and austerity have been imposed on everyday Arizonans in order to pay for corporate tax cuts. Trickledown economics doesn’t work.

Arizona should be funding education on all levels; strengthening our infrastructure; fostering small business development and entrepreneurship through public banking/community banking partnerships; and putting people back to work at good-paying jobs. These economic development ideas need funds to work but will greatly diversify and strengthen our economy. Since the Wall Street crash, Arizona has lagged behind other states in its recovery. It’s time to change economic development strategies.
[Basically the same as above.]

No. The Arizona government has been starved to the point where jobs have been lost, some departments barely function, and needed services are no longer provided to our citizens.

Budget cuts and austerity have been imposed on everyday Arizonans in order to pay for corporate tax cuts. Trickle down economics doesn’t work. When you’re in a hole, stop digging.

We should be growing our economy, not starving it through unnecessary austerity caused by self-imposed budget shortfalls.
Continuing to follow the failed economic policies of trickle down economics and austerity is a threat to Arizona’s future. The Arizona Legislature is throwing away $4 billion per year in corporate tax cuts, and more unaffordable tax cuts are planned in the coming years. Tax cuts have done nothing to create jobs or stimulate the economy in Arizona. They have only drained our state’s coffers and forced budget cuts, service cutbacks, layoffs, and other austerity measures onto everyday Arizonans. This is Robin Hood in reverse—give to the rich and take from the poor.

I would end the corporate tax cuts because 1) they didn’t achieve the desired goal and 2) we clearly can’t afford them. I would also take a hard look at sweetheart deals and tax credits and stand against ideologically based lawsuits.
Yes. I support Hillary Clinton for President. Women in the US are under attack with hundreds of anti-woman laws passed each year by Republican Legislatures Arizona’s. Women will never be equal until we have control over our own bodies, equal pay for equal work, an equal voice in government (not just a few seats), and passage of the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA).

I believe that the first woman president of the US will stand up for the 51%--the women of the US. It’s time for equality and paycheck fairness.
Vote.
“Web of Debt” by Ellen Brown
Elysium
Oak Creek Canyon
Sandra Day O’Connor. She was a moderate as a legislator, she proposed the Equal Rights Amendment in the Arizona Legislature, and she proved to be a fine legal scholar on the Supreme Court.