Arizona House, District 1 {_getChooseLabel(this.selections.length)}

Sixty lawmakers, two from each legislative district, comprise the House of Representatives. The chamber has been under GOP control since the mid-1960s. The partisan divide is currently 35 Republicans and 25 Democrats. The job pays $24,000 a year, plus mileage and per-diem during session.

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  • Noel Campbell
    (Rep)

  • Candidate picture

    Ed Gogek
    (Dem)

  • Candidate picture

    Jan Manolis
    (Dem)

  • David Stringer
    (Rep)

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Biographical Information

Why are you the best person for the job?

Do you support the teacher pay-raise plan passed by the Legislature and signed by Gov. Doug Ducey? Why or why not?

State funding for Arizona schools remains below pre-recession levels. How should the state address funding for its schools in next year’s budget? How would you pay for any increases?

Does Arizona do enough to require accountability and transparency for charter schools?

Would you support stricter gun laws, including raising the minimum age to 21 for all gun purchases, banning bump stocks and universal background checks on gun sales between private parties?

What should Arizona do to prevent mass shootings in schools?

As a legislator, would you be inclined to support additional tax cuts for individuals or businesses? If so, which taxes would you like to see reduced?

Should recreational marijuana use be legalized in Arizona? Why or why not?

Has Arizona taken the right approach by increasing restrictions on abortion providers and clinics? Why or why not?

What should Arizona be doing to prepare for a potential water-shortage declaration on the Colorado River?

Would you support a statewide law that bans discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people in public accommodations, such as restaurants and other businesses? Why or why not?

Would you support a statewide law to allow business owners and others to deny services to customers based on religious beliefs? Why or why not?

In terms of the economy, how can the Legislature best encourage sustainable growth that benefits people of all income levels?

Do you support further expanding the Empowerment Scholarship Account program, which provides state funding for private-school education?

What is your position on Proposition 305, the ballot measure that would repeal the Legislature’s 2017 expansion of the voucher program?

What role should Arizona play in helping the federal government secure the border with Mexico?

Has the Legislature done enough to address concerns about sexual harassment among its membership?

Is there an issue not mentioned about that you feel hasn’t received enough attention at the Capitol? How would you address it?

What is the greatest threat to Arizona’s future, and how would you address it?

Last spring, lawmakers – at the direction of the governor’s office – opted to not authorize the state’s expenditure of $56 million in federal aid for child-care costs for the working poor. Should the state accept the $56 million? Why or why not?

Family members who take in their relative’s children when the kids are removed from their parents’ home get a sliver of the money paid to foster parents, about $45 a month, compared to $650. What responsibility, if any, does the state have to these family members? Should they be paid the same as foster parents?

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Age 64
Campaign Phone (928) 713-0721
I’m a Democrat because I believe every Arizonan who is willing to work should have an opportunity to share in the American dream. As a product of public schools and universities, I believe in providing a quality education for every student. And as a physician who has worked in both community health and private practice, I believe everyone should have access to affordable health care. But today the American dream is threatened. We face a Republican Party that serves multi-millionaires, not the American people; a Republican Party that opposes affordable health care, opposes public education, and even opposes economic security for the middle class. It’s time that Arizona had a government that cares about people who work for a living. So I am running on the Democratic ticket to protect the middle class, and to ensure that everyone can earn a living wage, can afford health care for their families, can send their children to good schools, and can be secure in their own retirement.
In Arizona, per pupil school funding has decreased by 20 percent over the past decade. We now have the nation’s worst teacher pay and we can’t fill our vacancies. So I support the teacher pay raise plan passed by the legislature and signed by the Governor, but it’s a one-time pay raise that does not address the problems that years of neglect have created. I stand with the Red For Ed movement; we need to make teacher pay as well as pay for all support staff part of a fair salary that includes annual raises to keep their pay competitive. Further, we need to restore school funding to pre-recession levels, Arizona should pass no new tax cuts until per pupil funding reaches the national average, and we have a solid plan to maintain adequate funding for all public education, including universities.
Arizona desperately needs sustainable funding for public education, including universities. In recent years, our current elected officials have focused on tax cuts for big corporations and the very wealthy, and decimated public education to pay for those tax cuts. In 2017, the legislature voted to drain even more money from public schools by expanding so called Empowerment Scholarships. The citizens of Arizona fought back and gathered enough signatures to put the empowerment scholarship expansion on the 2018 ballot. Voting No on Prop 305 is the best way to address school funding in next year’s budget. Beyond that we must stop cutting taxes and close the large number of loopholes the Governor and Legislature have given to out of state corporations and wealthy special interests. If we close these loopholes, we can use the money to give every Arizona child a first-rate education. It’s a matter of priorities; educating our children should come before tax cuts for the rich.
Charter schools are not held to the same standards as traditional public schools. Charters don't answer to elected school boards, and can hire less qualified teachers. They’re allowed to engage in “related-party transactions” -- deals between charter schools and for-profit businesses owned by the charter operator or a family member. These are set-ups for corruption, and three-fourths of charters do it. Most egregious, if a charter sells a building purchased with taxpayer dollars, the owner keeps the profits. Traditional schools must return profits to the district. As for accountability, there’s almost none; state law forbids the auditor general from monitoring charters. A few charters are very good, but their overall results are no better. Yet they cost far more. In 2017, charters served 15% of Arizona students but took 26% of the state’s K-12 budget. We’d be better off fully funding traditional public schools to do their job well; then there would be far less demand for charters.
These are all reasonable protections that are supported by a majority of voters, but the main cause of gun violence is not the availability of guns or mental illness; the main cause is substance abuse. Most violent crimes are committed by people who are drunk or high. Even mass killers are often substance abusers. James Hodgkinson, who shot Rep. Steve Scalise, had a history of alcohol problems. but marijuana is found most often. Devin Kelly who killed 26 people at a Texas church, Dylan Roof who killed nine black parishioners in Charleston, SC, Planned Parenthood shooter Robert Dear, Boston Marathon bomber Dzokhar Tsarnaev, and the Bastille Day terrorist in Nice who drove his truck into a crowd were all heavy marijuana users. It would help if the press would pay more attention to substance abuse in stories of violence because it’s usually there. If we want to prevent violence, including gun violence, the most important step is to get serious about substance abuse prevention.
The best prevention is a close-knit community of students, staff and parents. Schools need enough counselors that every student has one adult he or she trusts and talks to regularly. That way bullying, talk of harming others, and weapons brought to school would all be reported to an adult on staff. All these incidents should then be assessed, not to punish, but to identify kids who are victimized, isolated or psychiatrically ill, and to get them help. All students and parents should know who to contact if someone says they want to kill others. If students are expelled, supportive adult contacts should be maintained. All this would create a close-knit community that leaves no one out, so no student feels alone or excluded. Some simple structural changes would also help: Metal detectors are expensive but work. Classrooms should have two entrances that lock from inside, so everyone can escape. Lastly, well trained staff may carry guns, but only at principal & school board discretion.
No. The current governor and legislature have passed repeated tax cuts. As a result, our schools are under-funded and our teachers are underpaid. We need to give every Arizona child an excellent education before one more penny is given out in tax cuts. The best way to produce future prosperity is education, not tax cuts, so let’s put our money where it will do the most good. The Red For Ed movement suggests no new tax cuts until Arizona’s per pupil funding reaches the national average, and I totally agree.
The problem isn’t adult users; it’s the marijuana industry. Other countries have relaxed their pot laws, but only the U.S. has an $8 billion profit-driven corporate industry with political influence. Like Big Tobacco, Big Pot makes 87% of its profit from heavy users who started as teens. So where it’s legal, the industry targets kids with marijuana cookies and candies. Ads also work; teens who see pot ads are twice as likely to try the drug. As a result, states with legal weed have the highest rates of adolescent use. Teen users do worse in school, drop out at twice the rate of non-users, and earn less as adults. Research shows teen use can even lower IQ. To stop pot advertising and the targeting of teens, we must remove the profit motive. So we should stop the sale of marijuana. We should train doctors to prescribe cannabinoid medicines like Marinol and Epidiolex to meet medical demand. And we should teach parents and teens about the harm pot causes to the developing adolescent brain.
Abortion is the issue that won’t go away because both sides have compelling arguments. I believe women must have the complete right to control their own bodies. However, millions of Americans just as certainly believe abortion takes a human life. The political parties are more interested in taking sides, but this issue can never be resolved by one side defeating the other. The only solution is prevention, and, fortunately, abortion is very preventable. Since by definition no one wants and unwanted pregnancy, prevention is a real possibility. The three big causes of unwanted pregnancy are substance abuse, unavailable or unused birth control, and economic insecurity. All three of those problems are preventable. If elected, I will work very hard to prevent unwanted pregnancy and thereby reduce the abortion rate. It’s the only way to successfully resolve an issue on which both sides have legitimate arguments.
The problem isn’t just severe drought; it’s climate change decreasing the Rocky Mountain snow pack that threatens our water supply. So Arizona should lead the way in getting off fossil fuels by creating a Clean Power Plan and joining the Paris Climate Accord. More immediately, we must complete our Drought Contingency Plan and join other states to protect our Colorado River water supply. Arizona has reduced its water use dramatically, but this crisis demands even more. We should stop mining irreplaceable ground water and consider regulating which crops we grow and which types of irrigation we use. For home and industry, we need public education about conservation and the safety of water recycling, which is more affordable than desalinization. Fixing leaks in canals and pipes should be a priority. We should set aside more money for drought-resistant landscaping, and encourage community pools instead of so many backyard pools. We must meet this challenge, and with leadership, we can.
I would. Every American deserves to feel like a first-class citizen in their own country. Equal protection under the law is a tenet of our democracy. Current science leans strongly to the conclusion that homosexuality is inborn, and in the United States, we do not discriminate against people for the way they were born.
No, I don’t. This is the United States, and in this country, no one should be discriminated against for reasons of race, religion, ethnicity, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, disability, social class or age. In particular, I do not support any denial of medical care. Much of the current demand for these laws seems to stem from anti-gay prejudice rather than religious belief. However, for some people the concerns really are based on a religious belief. In those cases, when someone truly believes it is their religious obligation not to provide a certain service or accommodation, it is that person’s responsibility not take a job that might require them to violate their religious beliefs.
There are three things Arizona should provide to make our state attractive to business: a well-educated work force, a clean and sober workforce, and the amenities that make cities especially desirable. Arizona has nice cities, but the need to attract industry is another reason we should take substance abuse prevention more seriously. It’s also a major reason we should fund public schools for every Arizona child, and should make college and university affordable. On top of those three issues, we also have to address the negative effects of climate change, particularly the incipient water shortage, which will make Arizona extremely unattractive to business. If we pay attention to all these issues, then we will attract a widely diverse set of potential employers. And a diverse economy with educated, hard-working employees is the path to sustained growth.
No. So-called Empowerment Scholarships are a direct and intentional assault on public education. They drain money from our public schools, where 95% of Arizona’s children get their education. A powerful group of out-of-state billionaires declared Arizona ground zero in its push to privatize education, which would mean de-funding and dismantling the public school system. Our Governor very publicly signed on to this idea and the state legislature supports it, too. Year after year they have cut school funding or failed to increase it along with inflation. As a result, Arizona now ranks 49th in the nation for per pupil school spending. Empowerment Scholarships are one more way the Governor and Legislature serve billionaires instead of the people of our state. Universal public education is the primary reason the United States is such a wealthy country. Why would anyone want to destroy that?
Prop 305 puts the action of the legislature expanding so-called Empowerment Scholarships up for a vote by all the people. Everyone who believes in public schools and wants a good education for every Arizona child should VOTE NO ON PROP 305.
We should support federal efforts, but not try to take over or lead the way. We should let them do their job. However, the current administration has shown a willingness to engage in heartless and immoral behavior. I am referring to separating children, including toddlers and infants, from their parents for extended periods. I believe it is our moral obligation to object and even withhold support in the face of such extreme inhumane actions.
We need an avenue for people to make complaints safely, but also a system that allows for investigation to confirm the validity of complaints before action is taken.
I’m a doctor who specializes in working with addicts and alcoholics. We need more substance abuse prevention and treatment, starting with our criminal justice system. Some want to punish drug users; others want to eliminate drug laws. I seek a third way, to use existing laws not for punishment but to get addicts into treatment and recovery. Letting addicts continue to use is no favor. Also, preventing substance abuse is the best way to drastically reduce crime, mass incarceration, gangs, domestic violence and child abuse. It would also decrease teen pregnancy, abortion, AIDS, prostitution, homelessness, poverty, chronic unemployment, welfare dependence, high school dropouts, health care costs, and the number of divorces, single moms, deadbeat dads, and grandparents raising grandkids. Plus, it would curb drunk & drugged driving and the opioid epidemic. Substance abuse is truly the modern world’s Pandora’s box. If elected, I will advocate strongly for prevention and treatment.
Our two greatest threats were discussed above. The first is climate change and the long-term water shortage it is creating. I would provide leadership to help people understand the mindset and lifestyle changes we will need to tackle this new reality. The second great threat to Arizona is the assault on public education by Charles Koch, our governor and our legislature. I will urge everyone to VOTE NO on PROP 305, and will work to find sustainable sources of funding for our public schools so every child in Arizona receives a first-rate education.

As a doctor who works with opioid addicts, I can’t ignore this epidemic. It began with prescription drugs, but now illicit opioids like heroin are the biggest killers. The way to prevent illicit drug abuse is to prevent teenage use of alcohol, tobacco and marijuana – which lead to harder drugs. This means taking on the addictive drug industries and launching an adolescent prevention program like this country has not seen in thirty years.
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Age 70
Twitter @AZ_Jan4
Campaign Phone (626) 340-7070
Unlike the incumbents in my Legislative District 1, I’d like to take Arizona in a new, healthy direction that’s good for the families and seniors of our state. I’ve had a long, successful career as a problem solver in the information technology field. While working for law enforcement, I built IT solutions to increase community safety and solve complex public challenges. My slogan, “Jan Can, We Can” reflects my ability to effectively work with others toward achieving important, shared goals. For many years, as an adjunct IT professor, I helped adult learners improve their vocational skills and earning potential. With an extensive history of community service, I’ve advocated for elders, dementia patients and their families to ensure healthcare and physical needs were met. The world has changed a lot since my childhood summers in Flagstaff. Today’s challenges require innovative solutions, so I’d like to work together to create opportunities in healthcare, public education, solar energ
I support the teacher pay raise plan passed by the Legislature and signed by the Governor, but it doesn’t go far enough. I stand with the Red-For-Ed movement and believe we need to make teacher pay raises a permanent part of a fair salary and step schedule that includes annual raises to keep teacher pay competitive and provides competitive pay for education support staff as well. We need to restore school funding to pre-recession levels, and most importantly, Arizona should pass no new tax cuts until per pupil funding reaches the national average.
Arizona desperately needs sustainable funding for public education, including universities. In recent years, our current elected officials have focused on tax cuts for big corporations and the very wealthy and have decimated public education to pay for those tax cuts. In the 2017 session, the Legislature voted to drain even more money from public schools by expanding so-called Empowerment Scholarships. The citizens of Arizona fought back and gathered enough signatures to put the empowerment scholarship expansion on the 2018 ballot. Voting NO on Prop 305 is the best way to address school funding in next year’s budget. Beyond that, we must stop cutting taxes and close the large number of loopholes the Governor and the Legislature have given to big out-of-state corporations and very wealthy special interests.
Currently, Arizona does not require accountability, transparency or oversight for charter schools. By state law, the State Auditor General is not allowed to review charter school spending, resulting in a lack of accountability. Fraud, waste and mismanagement associated with charter schools is in the billions. When charter schools go out of business, their owners keep all the assets.
Even though I support the rights outlined in the Second Amendment, I would support legislation would raise the minimum age for all gun purchases to 21, support legislation that makes bump stocks illegal, and support legislation requiring background checks on all gun sales, including private sellers at gun shows, on the internet, and elsewhere where guns may be purchased without background checks and no questions asked.

I support the Moms Demand Action initiative to beat back bills that would force guns into educational spaces. Elementary, middle and high school teachers should not be expected to do double-duty as sharpshooters, nor should they have to tolerate an environment where their colleagues or visitors in their schools might be carrying a loaded gun. And on college and university campuses, faculty should not have to wonder whether their students are bringing hidden, loaded guns into their classrooms and offices or vice-versa.
The Legislature can help prevent mass shootings in schools by doing a much better job of rebuilding a quality public education system. Because educators observe students’ emotional and behavioral development daily, they are best positioned to detect troubled behaviors. Social and emotional skills taught in school help prevent student violence. Students with more fluent social skills connect better with others and may be more able to recognize troubled peers who need help. Schools should hire more counselors and school resource officers who are the first line of defense against troubled students. Communities can help raise children. With many eyes and ears, they can detect smaller problems before young people grow into violence. Extreme violence is almost always preceded by behavioral problems including a propensity toward aggression, lack of social connectedness, a fascination with violence and guns. Doctors should conduct standard mental health screenings at health checkups.
NO
Yes.

Peer-reviewed, evidence-based studies have proven that recreational marijuana can be beneficial to patients suffering from illnesses such as AIDS, cancer, glaucoma, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injuries and many other serious, debilitating, or terminal conditions. With recreational marijuana, patients can reap the benefits of managing their symptoms without having to worry about addiction, overdose or, serious side effects that aren't worth the risk of pharmaceutical drugs. Legalizing marijuana also opens a new source of revenue for the states. In Colorado, for example, nearly $200 million in tax revenue was collected in 2016 on just over $1.3 billion in legal sales. Additionally, legalizing up to an ounce of Marijuana could save taxpayers at least $1.3 million in jail bookings plus more than two man-years of police officers’ times in Maricopa County
No.

The deeply personal decision to end a pregnancy should be between a woman, her partner, her doctor, and her faith. There is no role for politicians in that decision. We cannot go back to the days, which are not so far in the past, of coat-hanger abortions and women bleeding to death in alleys. In Roe v. Wade, the Supreme Court has set clear precedent in the “law of the land,” and policy decisions should be in accordance with that principle.

Of course, avoiding an unwanted pregnancy is the BEST way to reduce the number of terminations. Data has definitively shown that abortion rates drop when there is simple access to contraception and sex-education. We should have comprehensive, age-appropriate sex education in the classroom and ensure unhindered access to effective contraception.

Women’s reproductive health is an issue of civil rights, economic freedom, and religious freedom.
Arizona’s economy, quality of life, agriculture, and environment are on the line. Arizonans must take steps to respond to falling Lake Mead water levels, and enter a new phase of long-term collaboration, innovative water management, water conservation and efficiency, and water reuse. This requires a new look at how water cuts are implemented and how shortages can be avoided.

Arizona has already taken important action by implementing interim measures to keep more water in Lake Mead to help stave off federally mandated cutbacks of Colorado River water. The state has also been working with California, Nevada, and key water users within Arizona on plans to avoid critically low levels in Lake Mead. These actions are a good start, but temporary agreements are not long-term solutions.

Arizona must follow immediate actions and long-term plans that will help address Lake Mead’s falling water levels in ways that can protect groundwater and still allow Arizona’s agriculture, cities, Indian trib
Yes.

Every Arizonan should expect equal protection under the law regardless of age, disability, ethnicity, gender, marital status, national origin, race, religion, and sexual orientation.
No.

If an organization offers a public service or public accommodation, that organization should not be allowed to deny their service to a member of the public based on age, disability, ethnicity, gender, marital status, national origin, race, religion, and sexual orientation.
The Legislature must encourage sustainable growth that benefits Arizonans of all income levels by embracing policy ideas that will bring about rapid and efficient systemic changes. This could be accomplished by:

o Expand access quality K-12 education and job skills training for adults; o Ensure equality and quality in higher education; o Develop programs for sustainability transfer; o Require regional planning that integrates water use and mobility options in existing and new communities; o Enhance dedicated funding mechanisms that are available for environment restoration and community rehabilitation; o Update groundwater management policies; o Provide incentives and information to Arizona businesses to support industrial recycling facilities and more technologies for sustainability; o Create a sustainability scorecard and use it for consistent monitoring, feedback, and planning; and o Embrace sustainable goods, services, and knowledge as a focus for economic development.
No. Empowerment Scholarship Accounts (ESA) are school vouchers by another name. They use tax dollars taken out of public school budgets to subsidize private school tuition, online, and home schooling. Loss of funds to public education damages Arizona’s already underfunded public schools. Arizona ranks 48th for public school funding and last in the nation for teacher pay. Due to low teacher pay and meager school resources, more teachers flee Arizona classrooms each year. Nearly 2,000 classrooms statewide are without permanent teachers, and another 3,400 classrooms have been filled by people who are not trained to teach. Additionally, because a local public school is the only option in most rural areas, ESA vouchers are even more harmful for rural Arizona. Arizona’s rural public schools already have the second highest needs of any state in the nation. ESA vouchers harm 35% of Arizona students in rural districts by further under-funding their already poorly funded schools.
I will vote NO on Proposition 305. The Legislature’s 2017 expansion of the voucher program, SB1431, is a bill that expanded ESA vouchers beyond special categories of children (such as military and foster children and those with special needs) to all 1.1 million students in the state. The expansion would have been funded with money earmarked for public education, further damaging Arizona’s already underfunded public schools. Because of Save Our Schools (SOS) Arizona’s successful referendum campaign, a NO vote on Proposition 305 will repeal voucher expansion to all students in the state and retain funds for Arizona’s public schools
Arizona should continue to play a role in helping the federal government secure the border with Mexico, however I strongly oppose the current practice of separating immigrant families.
More work is needed to minimize the presence and threat of sexual harassment. An established, clearly stated policy against sexual harassment and training for all legislators to recognize and prevent sexual harassment are steps in the right direction. When women finally occupy at least 51% of the Legislature, then perhaps we will see the end of having to expel politicians from office for this reason.
Currently, Arizona employment law does not require employers to provide their employees with a lunch break. I think it’s about time we start treating workers with some basic consideration for their safety, health and well-being, and make lunch breaks mandatory.
To ensure a successful economy and promising future for the people of Arizona, we must change the current, unhealthy condition of Arizona’s public education system. Businesses want to set up shop where they will find a well-educated workforce and excellent public schools for their employees’ families. Once Arizona resumes investing in its public schools, businesses will once again start choosing Arizona as a great place to locate and grow.
YES, the state MUST accept the $54 million In federal aid for childcare. One quarter of Arizona’s children are living in poverty. Their parents live at a very low income level which prohibits child care expense.
YES, the state of Arizona needs to increase the money paid to families who take in children of relatives. In addition to the scant financial support family members receive, they do not get the same access to assistance and services foster families receive. Research shows children removed from their parents do best when placed other relatives. It is imperative to put kinship payments and access to assistance and services on par with those received by foster care parents.
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