Arizona Senate, District 25

Arizona's 30 state senators each represent a unique district of voters. Republicans have held the majority in recent years, although most recently by only a handful of votes.The job pays $24,000 a year, plus mileage and per-diem during session.

Click a candidate icon to find more information about the candidate. To compare two candidates, click the "compare" button. To start over, click a candidate icon.

  • Kathy Mohr-Almeida
    (Dem)

  • Tyler Pace
    (Rep)

Social Media

Biographical Information

Why are you the best person for the job?

Do you support the teacher pay-raise plan passed by the Legislature and signed by Gov. Doug Ducey? Why or why not?

State funding for Arizona schools remains below pre-recession levels. How should the state address funding for its schools in next year’s budget? How would you pay for any increases?

Does Arizona do enough to require accountability and transparency for charter schools?

Would you support stricter gun laws, including raising the minimum age to 21 for all gun purchases, banning bump stocks and universal background checks on gun sales between private parties?

What should Arizona do to prevent mass shootings in schools?

As a legislator, would you be inclined to support additional tax cuts for individuals or businesses? If so, which taxes would you like to see reduced?

Should recreational marijuana use be legalized in Arizona? Why or why not?

Has Arizona taken the right approach by increasing restrictions on abortion providers and clinics? Why or why not?

What should Arizona be doing to prepare for a potential water-shortage declaration on the Colorado River?

Would you support a statewide law that bans discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people in public accommodations, such as restaurants and other businesses? Why or why not?

Would you support a statewide law to allow business owners and others to deny services to customers based on religious beliefs? Why or why not?

In terms of the economy, how can the Legislature best encourage sustainable growth that benefits people of all income levels?

Do you support further expanding the Empowerment Scholarship Account program, which provides state funding for private-school education?

What is your position on Proposition 305, the ballot measure that would repeal the Legislature’s 2017 expansion of the voucher program?

What role should Arizona play in helping the federal government secure the border with Mexico?

Has the Legislature done enough to address concerns about sexual harassment among its membership?

Is there an issue not mentioned about that you feel hasn’t received enough attention at the Capitol? How would you address it?

What is the greatest threat to Arizona’s future, and how would you address it?

Last spring, lawmakers – at the direction of the governor’s office – opted to not authorize the state’s expenditure of $56 million in federal aid for child-care costs for the working poor. Should the state accept the $56 million? Why or why not?

Family members who take in their relative’s children when the kids are removed from their parents’ home get a sliver of the money paid to foster parents, about $45 a month, compared to $650. What responsibility, if any, does the state have to these family members? Should they be paid the same as foster parents?

Age 50
Family Husband and Daughter
Twitter @drkathyaz
Campaign Phone (480) 269-4416
I am the best candidate in this race because I represent Mesa’s values and am not a career politician. Mesa has been represented by politicians who’ve spent decades in government and who are out of touch with residents and working families. I am a working professional and small business owner. As a psychotherapist, I put my Ph.D. to work serving children and families in our city and through the Phoenix area. I’m also a mother who understands the value of a strong education system, excellent child and family services, and how bad governance can harm working families. I believe that Mesa and Arizona are stronger when our elected officials stand up for our people first.
I support the teacher pay-raise. Arizona’s children deserve a strong and competitive education system. We cannot have schools that compete in a 21st century economy if our best teachers can cross state lines to make $14,000 more per year. Failing to adequately fund education disadvantages our children, makes our economy less competitive, and will have lasting economic and social impacts. Beyond that, competitive teachers’ pay is simply the right thing to do. Teachers are professionals and should be paid for the professional and indispensable services they provide to our state. As we repair the damage done to our schools in the past decade, we must demonstrate that we support teachers and that teaching can be a career rather than a sacrifice.
We must restore education funding to pre-2008 levels, but we won’t be able to achieve that next year without diverting funds from other necessary services. This is due to prop 108 (1992) restricting the ability of the legislature to raise taxes, requiring a 2/3 vote, but allowing taxes to be cut with only a majority. This means that revenues that once funded state services are gone and will be very difficult to restore. I would like to propose legislation repealing this restriction. This would need to go before the voters, but its important that it does. Voter’s need to be made aware that they were sold a promise of fiscal responsibility that resulted in less revenue to provide services we all depend on and benefit from, such as public education.
Arizona must require accountability and transparency for all charter schools similar to what we require of traditional public schools. We know that, on average, charter schools cost us more and under-perform compared to traditional public schools. While there are good charters, the inconsistency and lack of accountability is unacceptable. They are also an apparent source of corruption. Legislators enriching themselves off of our public education dollars have no business making decisions on what the people of Arizona are permitted to see behind the curtains of their privately owned charter schools. A good first step to addressing this is eliminating the politically appointed charter school board and placing Arizona’s charters under the supervision of elected school boards.
I am a supporter of the right to responsibly own a firearm, but responsibility should require reasonable laws to ensure that the most dangerous weapons aren’t falling into the wrong hands. The voters on my district have also been clear on this. They do not want a ban on firearms, but they do support policies to improve public safety while protecting individual rights. These policy suggestions are only reasonable. I support banning bump stocks and universal background checks, but I also believe that addressing this epidemic of gun violence and mass shooting requires more investment in mental health services and rehabilitation for violent offenders.
March for Our Lives is asking for a few specific policy changes that can go a long way towards preventing more tragedies like Sandy Hook and Parkland. In additional to universal background checks and a ban on bump-stocks, they have requested that our state provide adequate funding for school counselors. Today, the ratio of school counselors to students is 1-954. This is nearly four-times higher than the recommended rate of 1-250. This request from March for Our Live is not only reasonable, but failing to improve access to in-school counseling services is simply unconscionable.
Taxation is a difficult question to address because of its complexity, but generally speaking, I would like to see a reduction in taxes that are inherently regressive, restoration of fair business taxes to stop the trend of shifting the tax burden onto the lower and middle-income earners, and closure of a number of loop holes that complicate our tax code to privilege a handful of out-of-state special interest groups. Our state is entirely too dependent on sales tax, which is far too volatile to be a reliable source of revenue. Our sales taxes on necessary consumable goods should be phased out and the revenue replaced. Whether we are talking about creating a tax, cutting existing taxes, or restructuring how we tax, we need to ask how the proposed change benefits Arizonans.
Yes. We have spent far too long and far too much money on prohibition of a cannabis. Legalization in Colorado did not increase the use of marijuana. The crime rate declined, fewer people are being detained for non-violent offenses, and the state is saving a significant about of tax payer money on law enforcement and corrections. Arizona could certainly put the added tax revenue of legal cannabis to good use funding schools, roads, and public transit instead of wasting money locking up nonviolent people who choose to use marijuana.
No. Regardless of one’s opinion on abortion, I think we can largely agree that medical decisions are best left between a patient and their doctor. The right to choose is about far more than abortion; its about a person’s fundamental right to personal bodily autonomy. Whether we are talking about when or if a woman wants to be a parent, end of life decisions, or any other medical treatment, the state has no place interfering in personal medical decisions. Deliberately making services more difficult to obtain is no different than the state deciding in advance that low-income women are not entitled to equal treatment under the law and equal access to necessary medical care.
Sadly, we are far beyond a reasonable deadline for preparing for a water shortage. At this point, we need state action to combat the damage that will be done in the event of a water-shortage declaration. This starts with immediate investment in infrastructure with water retention as the goal. This investment must be both rural and municipal and should include shading to reduce evaporative water loss on canals and reservoirs, aquifer recharging, retention basins, and other measures for retaining storm running off. Subsidy for converting agricultural operations from flood to drip irrigation could also help our agricultural sector weather heavy federal water restrictions that may come in the future.
Yes. Equality requires equal access to opportunity. This includes education, employment housing, but also equal rights to participate in the economy. Not only is nondiscrimination the right thing to do, but its also smart business. When our economy is welcoming to everyone, more people will be willing to visit our state, more business will consider Arizona for hiring, and members of marginalized groups will feel secure staying and contributing to our economy.
No. The law must apply to all of us. This includes civil rights and nondiscrimination laws. Additional, religion is something very personal. One individual’s interpretation may differ from another. In reference to creating religious exemptions to the law, the late Justice, Antonin Scalia said, “To permit this would be to make the professed doctrines of religious belief superior to the law of the land, and in effect to permit every citizen to become a law unto himself.” I agree.
Education is the best way to ensure sustainable growth because it is an investment in all people and an investment in our future workforce. Our state’s best option for putting us on the best track for economic prosperity for all is a well-funded public education system.
I do not. The expansion of the ESA program is pitched as “choice” be its really intended to break out already strained public education system. There is no school choice when the quality of education that a student can access is based solely on where they live and how much money their parent’s have. ESA expansion is bad for Arizona.
I support repealing the ESA voucher expansion.
Arizona has an important role to play in cooperating with federal authorities to reduce drug, weapons, and human trafficking. Having a secure border is important, but its also important to recognize the different responsibilities of state and municipal police. Our cities and towns are best served when local law enforcement focus on local safety issues. There is no reason for our cities to continue to assume the cost of doing the federal governments job on immigration. We pay federal taxes for federal enforcement. Our state and local law enforcement should be focuses on keeping our neighborhoods safe, a goal that is more difficult to achieve when immigrant communities live in fear.
I do not believe it has. We don't know much of the behind the scenes information on the handling of sexual harassment in the legislature, but what we do know is disturbing. The processes in place for addressing harassment must be revised to provide expedient and comprehensive consideration of harassment accusations.
This candidate has not responded to the survey.
Global climate change is the greatest threat to our states future. While this is a global issues and required global action, our state must do its part. This means putting Arizona on track for 100% renewable energy no later than 25 and launching state projects for forest restoration and carbon sequestration.
This candidate has not responded to the survey.
This candidate has not responded to the survey.
This candidate has not responded to the survey.
This candidate has not responded to the survey.
This candidate has not responded to the survey.
This candidate has not responded to the survey.
This candidate has not responded to the survey.
This candidate has not responded to the survey.
This candidate has not responded to the survey.
This candidate has not responded to the survey.
This candidate has not responded to the survey.
This candidate has not responded to the survey.
This candidate has not responded to the survey.
This candidate has not responded to the survey.
This candidate has not responded to the survey.
This candidate has not responded to the survey.
This candidate has not responded to the survey.
This candidate has not responded to the survey.
This candidate has not responded to the survey.
This candidate has not responded to the survey.
This candidate has not responded to the survey.
This candidate has not responded to the survey.
This candidate has not responded to the survey.