Arizona Senate, District 28

Arizona's 30 state senators each represent a unique district of voters. Republicans have held the majority in recent years, although most recently by only a handful of votes.The job pays $24,000 a year, plus mileage and per-diem during session.

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    Christine Porter Marsh
    (Dem)

  • Kate Brophy McGee
    (Rep)

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Biographical Information

Why are you the best person for the job?

Do you support the teacher pay-raise plan passed by the Legislature and signed by Gov. Doug Ducey? Why or why not?

State funding for Arizona schools remains below pre-recession levels. How should the state address funding for its schools in next year’s budget? How would you pay for any increases?

Does Arizona do enough to require accountability and transparency for charter schools?

Would you support stricter gun laws, including raising the minimum age to 21 for all gun purchases, banning bump stocks and universal background checks on gun sales between private parties?

What should Arizona do to prevent mass shootings in schools?

As a legislator, would you be inclined to support additional tax cuts for individuals or businesses? If so, which taxes would you like to see reduced?

Should recreational marijuana use be legalized in Arizona? Why or why not?

Has Arizona taken the right approach by increasing restrictions on abortion providers and clinics? Why or why not?

What should Arizona be doing to prepare for a potential water-shortage declaration on the Colorado River?

Would you support a statewide law that bans discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people in public accommodations, such as restaurants and other businesses? Why or why not?

Would you support a statewide law to allow business owners and others to deny services to customers based on religious beliefs? Why or why not?

In terms of the economy, how can the Legislature best encourage sustainable growth that benefits people of all income levels?

Do you support further expanding the Empowerment Scholarship Account program, which provides state funding for private-school education?

What is your position on Proposition 305, the ballot measure that would repeal the Legislature’s 2017 expansion of the voucher program?

What role should Arizona play in helping the federal government secure the border with Mexico?

Has the Legislature done enough to address concerns about sexual harassment among its membership?

Is there an issue not mentioned about that you feel hasn’t received enough attention at the Capitol? How would you address it?

What is the greatest threat to Arizona’s future, and how would you address it?

Last spring, lawmakers – at the direction of the governor’s office – opted to not authorize the state’s expenditure of $56 million in federal aid for child-care costs for the working poor. Should the state accept the $56 million? Why or why not?

Family members who take in their relative’s children when the kids are removed from their parents’ home get a sliver of the money paid to foster parents, about $45 a month, compared to $650. What responsibility, if any, does the state have to these family members? Should they be paid the same as foster parents?

Age 52
Family two sons, who are 23 and 25.
Campaign Phone (602) 622-9078
As a current teacher, mother, and former foster mother, I stand for kids--and always have. More than in any other year I can remember, Legislative District 28’s constituents are concerned about children in general and education in particular. I am proud that I was selected Arizona’s Teacher of the Year in 2016, and I look forward to providing a voice for all of us in LD28 who want Arizona to prioritize the support of public education in our budget and in our communities. My roots in this community are deep; I grew up in this district and taught in the community for 25 years, so I know this community well, and I see the problems created by the lack of compromise and negotiation at the Capitol. We need more balance, and that requires a change in the majority party in the House--or the Senate. I am running for the Senate in order to be part of that needed change; once elected, I will fight for negotiation and compromise.
It’s a step in the right direction, but it’s not enough. Arizona’s children have suffered under a decade of systematic cuts to public education. We have amongst the highest class sizes in the nation, amongst the lowest teacher pay, and a teacher shortage that has reached crisis proportions. Remedying these deficits will take a more significant investment than Ducey’s teacher pay-raise plan.
We need to re-evaluate our budget priorities. Arizona needs to increase funding for public education to the national average. We need dedicated and consistent revenue for public education. I would pay for increases by putting a cap on all corporate tax breaks, loopholes, and cuts. I would also put a firm cap on vouchers and STO’s. In addition, I would evaluate spending in other areas and I would look first for additional revenue in the Dept. of Corrections’ funding for private prisons and in the allocation of state funds to the Koch Brothers’ Freedom Schools at our state universities.
No.
Yes.
As a teacher, I see how frightened students are about gun violence in general and school shootings in particular, so I am highly motivated to address the issue of gun violence in our schools. It breaks my heart that my high school students are afraid.

There are certainly many measures that legislators can take to help reduce level of gun violence in this state. The legislature could enact sensible gun safety laws, like the bill introduced in the 2018 legislative session by Democratic House members--which would have banned bump stocks and created universal background checks, but that bill couldn’t even get a hearing. Those measures would be a step in the right direction.
No.
No, but I am in favor of decriminalizing it.
No. The government should stay out of the relationship that a woman has with her doctor.
We should have been preparing for this for years, but our current and past legislatures didn’t, so now we’re at crisis levels. The key to delaying a water-shortage declaration is the proposed Drought Contingency Plan, and our first priority should be in finalizing that agreement. Arizona will almost certainly fall below the 1075 level, so the the question is not necessarily how we avoid being cut; the question is how we slow down the losses. The state’s biggest user of water is agriculture, and any water-shortage declaration will affect those industries the most, which makes this an especially pressing issue. The state legislature will need to become a cohesive group of water experts in order to efficiently deal with this and will need to consider wise usage of our water levels; as a legislator, one of my highest priorities will be to create a policy that conserves our water. We’ve over allocated our water use, and we need to make adjustments to it.
Yes. As a teacher, I see the heartbreak faced every day by students because of their sexuality or gender, and I would vote for laws that support their right to equality and improve their chances of future success.
No. This would only open the door to legalized discrimination.
The goal should be to move more people up the income ladder, and the best way to do that is through education. Making sure people have health care is also important. We need to provide access to quality education and affordable healthcare for all Arizonans. We need a diversified workplace where people can earn a living wage and provide for themselves and their families. We live in a global economy, with exciting opportunities for innovation and development. A thriving economy and fair tax system will improve the lives of Arizonans at all income levels.
No.
I hope that the expansion of the voucher program is repealed. As a state, we aren’t investing enough in education to sustain a two-tiered system.
Immigration laws are a federal issue, so the state should function in a supportive role in relation to the federal government.
I was pleased the legislature addressed the issue; there’s no place for that kind of disrespectful behavior in any work environment.
There are too many conflicts of interest represented in the legislature, and I would introduce a bill to address unethical conflicts of interest.
The greatest threat to Arizona’s future is that we are not doing enough to provide our children with all of the tools necessary to become contributing members of society. Our current lawmakers’ actions suggest that they do not truly care about children, even though their words suggest otherwise. I would address it by making sure that our state’s children have access to the skills, knowledge, healthcare, and employment opportunities essential to their future success. Afterall, the future of our state depends on it.
Yes, the state should accept the $56 million. The working poor have to choose too often between the lesser of two evils: go to work and leave children home alone, or stay at home and struggle financially to feed them. Neither of those choices is in the best interests of children. Furthermore, childcare providers have had to close at an alarming rate in AZ because the reimbursements from subsidies haven’t changed since 2000, when the minimum wage was $5.15. The federal aid would help parents afford care and care providers stay in business, which is a win-win for the working poor and small business owners.
Yes. As a former foster mother, I understand the importance of doing what’s in the best interests of kids, and keeping kids with relatives is almost always going to be in their best interests. However, not every relative is financially able to care for a child. Because of the opioid epidemic, for example, we know that grandparents on a fixed income sometimes assume care of their grandchildren, and that places an enormous financial burden on those living off of Social Security and/or pensions. The subsidies are meant to help foster parents take on the financial care of a child, and why would that change if the caregivers are related? Foster children can have complicated emotional and psychological traumas, and making sure all foster families (including relatives) can meet these challenges is a productive way the state can help.
Age 63
Family Husband, Bob Sons, Robert, James and Samuel
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