California Congressional District 6

Click a candidate icon to find more information about the candidate. To compare two candidates, click the "compare" button. To start over, click a candidate icon.

  • Candidate picture

    Jrmar Jefferson
    (Dem)

  • Candidate picture

    Doris Matsui
    (Dem)

Social Media

Biographical Information

Guns: Describe federal gun restrictions or policies you would change.

Health care: Do you support a ““single-payer” health care system? Explain.

Immigration: How should California work with the Trump administration on immigration?

Taxes: Explain why the federal income tax overhaul enacted by Congress is a good thing or bad thing for Californians.

Marijuana: Do you favor decriminalizing marijuana under federal law? Explain.

Entitlement programs: What changes are needed to Medicare and Social Security?

Age 38
Birthplace (city) Texarkana, Tex.
Residence (city) Sacramento
Campaign telephone (510) 593-9207
Campaign email jrmarjefferson@gmail.com
Education Devry University, business and administration; American River College, political science.
I believe that every American should learn how to defend our country and their property. I am against background checks, simply because we can not control people's actions. We should have a society based on discipline. Background checks have yet to stop mass killings of mentally ill Americans. You can pass all the policy you want, but no one has thought to regulate the gun manufacturers. We have become a soft, politically correct society. We should not restrict anyone's freedom but regulate a continued education in weapon training and public works. We need a culture change, not the policy that harms hardworking Americans. If you don’t want a gun, you should still have to serve in an effort to defend our country. No Traitors, No Cowards, No Excuse. If we are to be invaded I am glad to know that the founding fathers ensured that we have the rights to bear arms. We spend a lot of money on weapons for the military while disarming the population to be defenseless.
People are sick not because they don’t have access to affordable health care coverage. People are sick because time is not on anyone's side and we age every day while we are eating unhealthy, behaving violently, overworked and stressed out, living paycheck-to-paycheck and not knowing what tomorrow may bring while still aware that a few people can afford not only to pay the increasingly skyrocketing cost to see a doctor and afford medicine but deceive us to think they give a damn. Congress has failed to regulate the FDA. The water is not ph level to where our bodies will naturally heal itself, the food supply is mostly GMO and we consume products that never spoil. People should see a price tag and then the country will make a decision to be healthy and work out and be nicer to each other.
California should have to obey all federal laws. My father, Delma Banks Jr., is still in jail because the State Of Texas did not obey federal laws. When you become lawless, American suffer. Theodore Roosevelt in 1907: “In the first place, we should insist that if the immigrant who comes here in good faith becomes an American and assimilates himself to us, he shall be treated on an exact equality with everyone else, for it is an outrage to discriminate against any such man because of creed, or birthplace, or origin. But this is predicated upon the person’s becoming in every facet an American and nothing but an American … There can be no divided allegiance here. Any man who says he is an American, but something else also, isn’t an American at all. We have room for but one flag, the American flag … We have room for but one language here, and that is the English language … and we have room for but one sole loyalty and that is a loyalty to the American people.”
The Democrats and Republicans in office benefit every time a new tax bill passes. Most of Congress are millionaires or friends of millionaires and billionaires. Neither has worked for us. The gas tax is a great example that Gov. Brown passed. As an Uber driver to make ends meet, that not only drives up the cost to do business but makes it harder for passengers to consume products and services. We the American people need new ideas like a flat tax and consumption tax. We need to stop taxing people to death and create new opportunities for people to create and consume.
The people of California voted to legalize marijuana, and the 10th Amendment should protect the people against the Controlled Substances Act that should be ruled unconstitutional. It violates every American's 10th Amendment and 14th Amendment rights. I favor decriminalizing every drug because it's hypocritical to allow pharmaceutical companies to break the same law many Americans have been fined and sent to prison for. Once again this is a failure of the do-nothing Congress. While we struggle, they twiddle their fingers. Black men are in jail for what now white men want to profit from. Wrong, Wrong, Wrong.
We need a New Deal. The same Democrats and Republicans have created this mess by funding endless wars, underfunding education budgets and creating a police state filled with a generation of individuals who will never see a penny of Social Security. What we need is to stop big banks and greedy people from destroying our way of life and focus on rebuilding our society and infrastructure. People don’t have enough to make it, so create a situation where everyone wins: the government, the people, and the planet.
Age 74
Birthplace (city) Poston, Ariz.
Residence (city) Sacramento
Campaign telephone (916) 551-1429
Education Bachelor’s degree, psychology, U.C. Berkeley.
Experience Member of Congress, 2005-present; Collier, Shannon, Rill & Scott, 1998-2004.
I believe that Congress has a responsibility to confront and understand America’s gun violence epidemic. Congress has the power to mitigate gun violence by passing common-sense gun laws that strengthen our background check system, fund gun violence research, close loopholes that allow some domestic abusers to possess firearms, and keep military-style firearms out of our communities. An important bill we should pass is the Public Safety and Second Amendment Rights Protection Act, which will expand background checks to cover all commercial firearm sales including firearms sold at gun shows, over the internet, and in classified ads. Closing background check loopholes is critical to making sure criminals and other dangerous people do not have access to firearms. It is also a policy that over 90 percent of Americans support.
It is my goal to achieve universal health care coverage, which will require expanding access to affordable, quality health care for everyone. The Affordable Care Act made great strides toward achieving this goal, especially in California, and we must continue to fight to protect the gains made under the ACA. The current administration and Republicans in Congress continue their attacks on the ACA, but the American people have shown that they support access to Medicaid, protections for those with pre-existing conditions, and lowering of out-of-pocket costs. I cosponsored HR 676, the Expanded & Improved Medicare For All Act, as an option for achieving universal coverage. The ACA is our current best hope to get the care people need today, and we must continue to build on its successes.
California must continue its strong support of our immigrant populations. It is not only the right thing to do, but we are a better state and country when we have a more diverse and economically strong population. California must continue to file lawsuits against the Trump administration when it promotes backward immigration policies. We must also continue to join with other states that value their immigrant populations, as we are in a stronger position when we have allies. There are so many leaders in sectors from technology to medicine, and science to business, who come from an immigrant background, and they are important voices in efforts to push back against the Trump administration.
The Republican tax bill that passed Congress last year and was signed by the President is a bad deal for both our country’s and California’s economies. It explodes the federal debt and threatens popular programs like Medicare, weakens our health care system by reversing coverage gains made by the Affordable Care Act, and is a giveaway to corporations and the wealthiest 1 percent. About one in three California households claim tax deductions that are limited in the bill. The legislation caps the state and local tax (SALT) deduction, which will shift hard-earned California dollars out of state and put more pressure on local governments' ability to fund public services that families rely on. More than 4 million California households deduct interest on mortgages, so limiting that deduction puts home ownership further out of reach for families.
The disconnect between state and federal law on marijuana use is confusing and arbitrary in its enforcement. Attorney General Sessions’ decision to rescind the “Cole Memorandum,” which allowed states to pursue their own cannabis policy, has only added to this confusion. California’s voters spoke loud and clear with the passing of Proposition 64. In order to respect our state’s voters we must find a way to not have conflicting laws on the books. That means Congress must either decriminalize marijuana or pass legislation to protect marijuana sales in states where they are legal.
Medicare and Social Security have proven themselves to be critical pieces of our social safety net, working to ensure Americans have health and financial security in retirement and disability. We need to protect these programs from cuts while working to improve them and expand benefits to ensure they work for those who rely on them. For example, we should ensure that Medicare beneficiaries have access to telehealth services and we should ensure that coverage for needed services remains affordable. Ever since Social Security’s creation after the Great Depression and later with the addition of Medicare, our country has reaped the benefits of a more financially secure population. As our population continues to age, we will need more investment than ever in these programs.